Efficacy of methadone for the management of postoperative pain in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: A randomized clinical trial

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2021

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Medwave

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item.page.issne

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Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation

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Resumen

Background: Postoperative pain management contributes to reducing postoperative morbidity and unscheduled readmission. Compared to other opioids that manage postoperative pain like morphine, few randomized trials have tested the efficacy of intraoperatively administered methadone to provide evidence for its regular use or be included in clinical guidelines. Methods: We conducted a randomized clinical trial comparing the use of intraoperative methadone to assess its impact on postoperative pain. Eighty-six patients undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were allocated to receive either methadone (0.08 mg/kg) or morphine (0.08 mg/kg). Results: Individuals who received methadone required less rescue morphine in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit for postoperative pain than those who received morphine (p =0.0078). The patients from the methadone group reported less pain at 5 and 15 minutes and 12 and 24 hours following Post Anesthesia Care Unit discharge, exhibiting fewer episodes of nausea. Time to eye-opening was equivalent between the two groups. Conclusion: Intraoperative use of methadone resulted in better management of postoperative pain, supporting its use as part of a multimodal pain management strategy for laparoscopic cholecystectomy under remifentanil-based anesthesia.

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METHADONE, MORPHINE, POSTOPERATIVE PAIN, INTRAVENOUS ANESTHESIA, LAPAROSCOPIC, HOLECYSTECTOMY

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bajo una licencia Creative Commons Atribución-No Comercial 3.0 Unported. Esta licencia permite el uso, distribución y reproducción del artículo en cualquier medio, siempre y cuando se otorgue el crédito correspondiente al autor del artículo y al medio en que se publica, en este caso, Medwave.

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